The Interactive Experience

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Click these to see character illustrations from the play

when you see one of these icons,

you may click or tap to interact.

Click these to see character illustrations from the play

“Edward Ferrars was not recommended to their good opinion by any peculiar graces of person or address. He was not handsome, and his manners required intimacy to make them pleasing,[...] but when his natural shyness was overcome, his behaviour gave every indication of an open, affectionate heart.” (S&S, pg. 22)

“Oh! Mama, how spiritless, how tame was Edward’s manner in reading to us last night! [...] I could hardly keep my seat. To hear those beautiful lines which have frequently almost driven me wild, pronounced with such impenetrable calmness, such dreadful indifference!” (S&S, pg. 25)

“Mrs. John Dashwood had never been a favourite with any of her husbands family; but she had no opportunity, till the present, of showing them with how little attention to the comfort of other people she could act when occasion required it.”  (S&S, pg. 11)

“As a house, Barton Cottage, though small, was comfortable and compact; but as a cottage it was defective, for the building was regular, the roof was tiled, the window shutters were not painted green, nor were the walls covered with honeysuckles.” (S&S, pg. 28)

I think one of the most striking images in this show is the piano from the Cottage. We took a lot of inspiration from the idea of nature being uncontrollable, growing where it pleases. It was wonderful to get to create these vines that invade the piano, especially in it's connection to Marianne. I think she is constantly being invaded by gossip and by love."

Zoe, Set Designer

 In the creation of this project, we talked a lot about open and cluttered spaces, and how both can be freeing or stifling. This scene is an example of how a wide open space can make us feel vastly alone. Elinor has to bear the crushing weight of nothingness, of loneliness, and she chooses to do so in silence. Alone.

Zoe, Set Designer

“Her face was crimsoned over, and she exclaimed in a voice of the greatest emotion, ‘Good God! Willoughby, what is the meaning of this? Have you not received my letters? Will you not shake hands with me?’ He could not then avoid it, but her touch seemed painful to him, and he held her hand only for a moment.”(S&S, pg. 176-177)

London is a very flexible space. The trellises create a nice uniform area were we can peer in through the windows and peep like the Gossips. The space feels like a snowglobe or a hotel room; very presentational. We even rotate around it like our characters are in a display case for our amusement."

Zoe, Set Designer

So many birds! We can feel the pressure that the Gossips bring into the space. They're always watching and ready to pounce. I carefully made the birds appear from nothing, as if they are always just one moment away from turning on you."

Zoe, Set Designer

“Mrs. Ferrars looked exceedingly angry, and drawing herself up more stiffly than ever, pronounced in retort this bitter phillippic: ‘Miss Morton is Lord Morton’s daughter.’ Fanny looked very angry too, and her husband was all in a fright at his sister’s audacity." 

(S&S, pg. 236)

Ah yes, returning to Norland Park. How horrible must it have been for the Dashwoods to see that Fanny had ruined their lost home. I think the biggest takeaway in this scene is the symmetry; nature is amorpheous and free, yet Fanny will stop at nothing to control it."

Zoe, Set Designer

In this scene Marianne's world ends, her heart breaks, she shatters. I think part of that shattering comes from the realization that she, that all of us, are trapped in a cage. It just so happens to be a bird cage."

Zoe, Set Designer

When there, at her own particular request, for she was impatient to pour forth her thanks to him for fetching her mother, Colonel Brandon was invited to visit her. His emotion in entering the room, in seeing her altered looks, and in receiving the pale hand which she immediately held out to him, was such, as, in Elinor’s conjecture, must arise from something more than his affection for Marianne…" 

(S&S, pg. 340)

This willow tree is Marianne. She is finally alone, free from the judgement and the pressure. When she lets go of the world, she is free to bloom."

Zoe, Set Designer

“Mrs. Jennings’s prophecies, though rather jumbled together, were chiefly fulfilled… she found in Elinor and her husband, as she really believed, one of the happiest couples in the world. They had in fact nothing to wish for, but the marriage of Colonel Brandon and Marianne, and rather better pasturage for their cows.”

(S&S, pg. 374-75)

We looked to wildflowers of Britain for inspiration for this final scene. Throughout the show we see roses, vines, weeds, but the beauty of a wildflower, and the fact that it is in name wild, is the perfect image that can only represent the love we find by the end of the show. Love is not something you can control, no matter how much we would want to, so letting it blossom how it wants is how we can see its beauty. "

Zoe, Set Designer

Thank you for enjoying.